Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. a dance performed by men only.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Theseus, by his skill and leadership in the bull-dance, kept his team of Athenians alive till in the confusion following one of the great Cretan earthquakes (of whose approach he had an inherited premonition) he led the oppressed native serfs and the captive bull-dancers in a successful revolt.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • Only with the bull-dance would I coax him to come my way.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • Not far behind me was the Isthmus journey, not knowing at dawn what the day would bring; Crete, and the bull-dance.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • I should have known he would draw me back to the bull-dance, which was sacred when the first earth-men fought each other with axes and knives of stone.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • That day in Crete after the bull-dance she had begged a lock of my hair, saying, as little children do who know nothing of the matter, that one day she would marry me.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • It is used in the rites of the bull-dance, and by the native serfs; you must go to Crete to learn it.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • I, who had been in Crete; who had seen tossing in the bull-dance such silver hair.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • Instead I had learned the bull-dance, and their minds.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • My thoughts were far off, at the bull-dance, or some old war; when the floor shook beneath my bed, and my cup fell from the stand beside me.

    The Bull From The Sea

  • Before the bull-dance, they would bring in the little ones of the princely houses, just to see the procession of the dancers into the ring, and be shown the first in fame.

    The Bull From The Sea

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