Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of bulwark.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The D'Haran forces had set up their defensive lines to the north, bulwarking the way to Aydindril.

    Men Don't Leave Me

  • Despite his insistence that he preferred water to land, the dragon had no trouble smashing his way through the foliage bulwarking the water's edge.

    A Corridor in the Asylum

  • The coalition also has to include real Liberals (often Euro sceptics by the way) who surely must wince to be bulwarking the most centralising and coercive government we have had since the war under the banner “Liberal”.

    Archive 2007-10-07

  • Holger, my darling bear, you're but bulwarking loutish peasants and fat-gutted burghers, when the mirth and thunder and blazing stars of Chaos could be yours.

    Three Hearts and Three Lions

  • A vigorous sweeping of my room, the preparation of an elaborate luncheon salad, and the total rearrangement of the parlor furniture might help to get rid of that heart-beating expectation -- soothing, and bulwarking me around with domesticity.

    The Other Side of the Door

  • He left General Totten on the stairs, leaped down the remaining steps, and ran to a group of watchmen and night employees of the State House who were bulwarking the soldiers.

    All-Wool Morrison

  • His inquiries had been bent towards so disposing the financial operations, so bulwarking the mining industry by sagacious designs, that, when the worst came, they all would be able to weather the storm.

    The Project Gutenberg Complete Works of Gilbert Parker

  • Whatever ‘it’ is I don’t think it will be in Europe … maybe while the Anglosphere is fixated on bulwarking Britain, Uncle Joe strikes EAST into Alaska and Canada - his troops will be way more used to that harsh environment that Western troops and he may be able to present a two front fait accompli that only his K-ness can resolve …?

    Cheeseburger Gothic » And now, Gentlemen, down to business.

  • Why, Holger, my darling bear, you’re but bulwarking loutish peasants and fat-gutted burghers, when the mirth and thunder and blazing stars of Chaos could be yours.

    Archive 2008-09-01

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