Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or condition of being a burgess; citizenship.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state of privilege of a burgess.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or condition of being a burgess.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From burgess +‎ -ship.

Examples

  • It is computed by the historians that out of three thousand families who composed the population of Geneva towards the end of the seventeenth century, there were hardly fifty who before the Reformation had acquired the position of burgess-ship.

    Rousseau

  • Membership in the gild was not exactly coincident with burgess-ship; persons who lived outside of the town were sometimes admitted into that organization, and, on the other hand, some inhabitants of the town were not included among its members.

    An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of England

  • Geneva towards the end of the seventeenth century, there were hardly fifty who before the Reformation had acquired the position of burgess-ship.

    Rousseau (Volume 1 and 2)

  • This afternoon after dinner comes Mr. Stephenson, one of the burgesses of the town, to tell me that the Mayor and burgesses did desire my acceptance of a burgess-ship, and were ready at the Mayor's to make me one.

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Mar/Apr 1661/62

  • Alexander disdained the ambassadors of Corinth, who came to offer him a burgess-ship of their city; but when they proceeded to lay before him that Bacchus and Hercules were also in the register, he graciously thanked them.

    The Essays of Montaigne — Complete

  • Amongst those empty favours of hers, there is none that so much pleases vain humour natural to my country, as an authentic bull of a Roman burgess-ship, that was granted me when I was last there, glorious in seals and gilded letters, and granted with all gracious liberality.

    The Essays of Montaigne — Complete

  • In the spring of 1763 he deliberately renounced in all due forms his rights of burgess-ship and citizenship in the city and republic of Geneva. [

    Rousseau (Volume 1 and 2)

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