Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who bustles; an active, stirring person.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An active, stirring person.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who bustles; an active, stirring person.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

bustle +‎ -er

Examples

  • For this Englishman is a terrible bustler and horrible coil-keeper.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • I am no great bustler at any time; but since being here, I have purposely abstained from all manifestation of curiosity, and never desired or requested to see much; it rouses suspicion, and suspicion rouses distrust, and distrust draws the kris.

    The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido For the Suppression of Piracy

  • Cargill's mind, with as much acuteness as the pass of a rapier might have done through his body; and we cannot help remarking, that a forward prater in society, like a busy bustler in a crowd, besides all other general points of annoyance, is eternally rubbing upon some tender point, and galling men's feelings, without knowing or regarding it.

    St. Ronan's Well

  • But for most the curse only really began to exercise full malignancy with the £135,000 purchase of woolly-nutted bustler Billy Ashcroft from Wrexham in 1977.

    Blogposts | guardian.co.uk

  • EoghanC Winners of the 2009 architectural 3d awards by CGArchitect up at bustler.

    Gaea Times (by Simple Thoughts) Breaking News and incisive views 24/7

  • It was singular to observe with what freedom from excitement he discussed the most irritating phases of party, -- speaking of the men and events of his own day with as much philosophic calmness as if they belonged to a previous century; not at all deceived, I think, by the temporary notoriety and power which frequently attend the political bustler, -- quite positive, indeed, that many of our "great men" were far inferior to multitudes in private life.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 21, July, 1859

  • Cargill’s mind, with as much acuteness as the pass of a rapier might have done through his body; and we cannot help remarking, that a forward prater in society, like a busy bustler in a crowd, besides all other general points of annoyance, is eternally rubbing upon some tender point, and galling men’s feelings, without knowing or regarding it.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • This little chamber, set out with perfect neatness; looking out on a very pretty piece of verdure and a cleanly court-yard; with such a good couple to provide for her; with her privacy unapproachable but at her own pleasure; her quiet undisturbed by a prater, a scolder, a bustler, or a whiner; no dirty children to offend the eye, or squalling ones to wound the ear; with admitted claims to the gratitude, confidence, and affection of her hostess: might not these suffice to make a lowly, unambitious maiden happy?

    Jane Talbot

  • There goes one, by the side of whom many a bustler in letters is only a worthless drone, many an idolized celebrity a weak and pitiful sham! "

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 21, July, 1859

  • Another thing is, there is a blockhead of an old Cavalier, who must needs be a bustler in the Countess of Derby’s behalf — he is fast in hold, with the whole tribe of witnesses at his haunches.”

    Peveril of the Peak

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