Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A buttress of an arch; the supporter, or that part which joins it to the upright pier.
  • n. The mass of stone or solid work at the end of a bridge, by which the extreme arches are sustained, or by which the end of a bridge without arches is supported.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A buttress of an arch; the supporter, or that part which joins it to the upright pier.
  • n. The mass of stone or solid work at the end of a bridge, by which the extreme arches are sustained, or by which the end of a bridge without arches is supported.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An abbreviated form of abutment.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Shortening of abutment.

Examples

  • "This way of tying walls together with iron, instead of making them of that substance and form, that they shall naturally poise themselves upon their butment, is against the rules of good architecture," says one; and George Herbert has this line: "Houses are built by rule, and commonwealths."

    Memorial Sermons

  • Beyond the Park, Haarlem Lane, Manhattanville, and Carmansville take up the thread of civic population, and carry it, among metropolitan houses and lamp-posts, quite to the butment of High Bridge.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865

  • Its form is octangular, having a strong butment at each angle, surmounted with pinnacles.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 17, No. 470, January 8, 1831

  • It is not at all an improbable fuppofi - tion, that the fecond architedl had placed his whole confidence in the iron ban - dage, before taken notice of; concluding, that the butment of the grand arches, was already fecured by the length of the building each way, from them to the outer walls and buttreffes; and fo fixed up all thefe braces, when neceflity called for them, and not before.

    A description of that admirable structure, the cathedral church of Salisbury. : With the chapels, monuments, grave-stones, and their inscriptions. To which is prefixed an account of Old Sarum.

  • I stand and seems to reverberate and being met by the more impetuous courant they role and swell into half formed billows of great hight which rise and again disappear in an instant. this butment of rock defends a handsom little bottom of about three acres which is deversified and agreeably shaded with some cottonwood trees; in the lower extremity of the bottom there is a very thick grove of the same kind of trees which are small, in this wood there are several Indian lodges formed of sticks. a few small cedar grow near the ledge of rocks where I rest. below the point of these rocks at a small distance the river is divided by a large rock which rises several feet above the water, and extends downwards with the stream for about 20 yards. about

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • I see several skelletons of the buffaloe lying in the edge of the water near the Stard. bluff which I presume have been swept down by the current and precipitated over this tremendious fall. about 300 yards below me there is another butment of solid rock with a perpendicular face and abot 60 feet high which projects from the Stard. side at right angles to the distance of 134 yds. and terminates the lower part nearly of the bottom before mentioned; there being a passage arround the end of this butment between it and the river of about 20 yardes; here the river again assumes it's usual width soon spreading to near 300 yards but still continues it's rappidity. from the reflection of the sun on the spray or mist which arrises from these falls there is a beatifull rainbow produced which adds not a little to the beauty of this majestically grand senery. after wrighting this imperfect discription I again viewed the falls and was so much disgusted with the imperfect idea which it conveyed of the scene that I determined to draw my pen across it and begin agin, but then reflected that I could not perhaps succeed better than pening the first impressions of the mind; I wished for the pencil of Salvator Rosa or the pen of Thompson, that I might be enabled to give to the enlightened world some just idea of this truly magnifficent and sublimely grand object, which has from the commencement of time been concealed from the view of civilized man; but this was fruitless and vain.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • I took my position on the top of some rocks about 20 feet high opposite the center of the falls. this chain of rocks appear once to have formed a part of those over which the waters tumbled, but in the course of time has been seperated from it to the distance of 150 yards lying prarrallel to it and forming a butment against which the water after falling over the precipice beats with great fury; this barrier extends on the right to the perpendicular clift which forms that board of the river but to the distance of 120 yards next to the clift it is but a few feet above the level of the water, and here the water in very high tides appears to pass in a channel of 40 yds. next to the higher part of the ledg of rocks; on the left it extends within

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

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