Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of byway.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I should read every book that comes out, in every distant by-way of every speculative genre, as soon as it comes out.

    Brian Ruckley · Alt.Fiction 2008: Getting There, Being There, Getting Back

  • This single appointment helped formulate an opinion in the minds of many Americans about this virtually unknown man from Hawaii, Kenya, Indonesia, by-way of Chicago.

    One Hundred Days of President Barack Obama: So Far, So Good

  • Researching my post on Hey Jude led medown a fascinating by-way.

    Music

  • Then he took the bag and entering the city walked on, enquiring for the quarter al-Karkh and the station of the merchants, till Destiny drave him to a by-way, wherein were ten houses, five fronting five, and at the farther end was a two-leaved door with a silver ring.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Down upon her knees in the foul mud of the by-way into which they have strayed — an empty street without a thoroughfare giving on the dark gardens of the Hospital — the lady would drop in her passionate entreaty, but that Sally prevents her.

    No Thoroughfare

  • But in all the long streets and broad squares, there were none but strangers; it was quite a relief to turn down a by-way and hear his own footsteps on the pavement.

    Master Humphrey's Clock

  • At the expiration of this time they had come to a little by-way on the right, leading down a slope to a pool of water.

    A Pair of Blue Eyes

  • They went side by side down the road in silence, and in silence turned into the cinder-made by-way that presently opened out the prospect of the valley.

    The Door in the Wall, and other stories

  • Secondly, and this leads into an odd by-way, the tree ring chronology "looks" much too smooth to be an annual tree ring chronology.

    Jacoby in Mongolia « Climate Audit

  • But yonder runs the highway, windy, hard, and austere, a sort of dry happiness that will endure; and here is the pleasant by-way — lush, my boy, lush, as the poets have it, and with its certain man-trap among the flowers

    Love and Mr Lewisham

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