Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of byzant.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “I know the armour well; it is that which the Venetian commissary offered your highness, just ere you became ill, for five hundred byzants.”

    The Talisman

  • “Why,” said Wamba, “an your valour be so dull, you will please to learn that those honest fellows balance a good deed with one not quite so laudable; as a crown given to a begging friar with an hundred byzants taken from a fat abbot, or a wench kissed in the greenwood with the relief of a poor widow.”

    Ivanhoe

  • “Gramercy! good fellow,” cried Prince John, “thou pleasest me — Here, Isaac, lend me a handful of byzants.”

    Ivanhoe

  • The watchman, unable to keep his eyes off the cup, so greatly did he admire it, offered, if his guest would play him for it, to stake a thousand byzants on his side.

    Fleur and Blanchefleur

  • Fleur accepted the challenge, and next day staking two hundred byzants against as many on the watchman's side, he again contrived, by help of the ring, to win the game and stakes, and as before handed over the latter to his antagonist, who, equally amazed and delighted by such unwonted liberality, declared himself ready to perform any service for so generous a player.

    Fleur and Blanchefleur

  • Next day the stakes rose to four hundred byzants on either side, and were won by

    Fleur and Blanchefleur

  • Sam; "but it is not my business nor prithee thine; since by the laws of the tournament a knight may ride masked for a specified time or until a particular purpose is achieved, that purpose being, I wot, victory for himself and for me a handful of byzants from thee."

    A Knight of the Cumberland

  • If it be less than a thousand byzants, let him have jewels to make it up. ''

    The Talisman

  • ` ` Why, '' said Wamba, ` ` an your valour be so dull, you will please to learn that those honest fellows balance a good deed with one not quite so laudable; as a crown given to a begging friar with an hundred byzants taken from a fat abbot, or a wench kissed in the greenwood with the relief of a poor widow. ''

    Ivanhoe

  • ` ` Nay, '' said Isaac, releasing his hold, ` ` it grieveth me as much to see the drops of his blood, as if they were so many golden byzants from mine own purse; and I well know, that the lessons of

    Ivanhoe

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