Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In classical antiquity, a large vessel for the drawing and transportation of liquids, as wine, oil, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A silly fellow to look to, may have more wit, learning, honesty, than he that struts it out Ampullis jactans, &c. grandia gradiens, and is admired in the world's opinion: Vilis saepe cadus nobile nectar habet, the best wine comes out of an old vessel.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • The (_talb cadus_) minister paid us a visit, to say that the emperor requested we would take the following day to rest from our journey, and at eight o'clock on the following morning, he would receive us; the present was accordingly prepared, which was

    An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa

  • [Footnote 126: The emperor's prime-minister, or _talb cadus_ at that time.] [Footnote 127: Dr. Broussonet, French consul.

    An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa

  • Mequinas is the court town of the north, and resembles the Hague, where few reside but such as are employed in the service of the crown.] [Footnote 107: This word was used by the seed, or emperor, in the presumption that it is understood by Europeans; but _cadus_ is the Arabic term.]

    An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa

  • _Est mihi nonum superantis annum plenus Albani cadus_, "continued Mr. Bellingham, who never quoted Horace once without quoting him again in the next five minutes.

    Doctor Claudius, A True Story

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