Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A name given to the Crescentia Cujete, a bignoniaceous tree of tropical America, on account of its large gourd-like fruits, the hard shells of which are made into numerous domestic utensils, as basins, cups, spoons, bottles, etc. The black calabash-tree of the West Indies is Crescentia cucurbitina.
  • n. A name given to the baobab of Africa, Adansonia digitata. See baobab.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Page 178 that was swung between the door jamb and a calabash-tree.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • Dr. Gregg, through the prestige of his whiskers and as a bribe against the relation of his imminent professional tales, was conceded the hammock that was swung between the door jamb and a calabash-tree.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • The euphorbia, acacia, and baobab or calabash-tree were all in bloom; and here and there, through openings between the trunks of the mangroves, glimpses were caught of rich splashes of deep orange-colour, standing out like flame against the dark background of shadowed foliage, that subsequent investigation proved to be clumps of elegant orchids.

    The Pirate Slaver A Story of the West African Coast

  • Indians say was found in the hollow trunk of an old tutumo, or calabash-tree (Crescentia cujete).

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • Vessels, also, were procured from the outside shell of the fruit, which served in the same manner as those obtained from the gourd or calabash-tree.

    Ran Away to Sea

  • When our meal was finished, we supplied ourselves with torches from some dry branches of the calabash-tree, and, headed by a guide, moved towards the mouth of the nearest and largest of the two caves.

    The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815

  • The ancient town of Cumanagoto is celebrated in the country for a miraculous image of the Virgin, * which the Indians say was found in the hollow trunk of an old tutumo, or calabash-tree (Crescentia cujete).

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 3

  • Domingo and Mary, wishing, in imitation of their mistresses, to recall to mind Angola and Foullepoint, the places of their birth in Africa, gave those names to the little fields where the grass was sown with which they wove their baskets, and where they had planted a calabash-tree.

    Paul et Virginie. English

  • His senses were cognizant of brilliant scarlets and ochres amid the vert of the coppice, of odours of fruit and bloom and the smoke from Chanca's clay oven under the calabash-tree; of the treble laughter of the native women in their huts, the song of the robin, the salt taste of the breeze, the diminuendo of the faint surf running along the shore -- and, gradually, of a white speck, growing to a blur, that intruded itself upon the drab prospect of the sea.

    Cabbages and Kings

  • His senses were cognizant of brilliant scarlet and ochres amid the vert of the coppice, of odours of fruit and bloom and the smoke from Chanca's clay oven under the calabash-tree; of the treble laughter of the native women in their huts, the song of the robin, the salt taste of the breeze, the diminuendo of the faint surf running along the shore -- and, gradually, of a white speck, growing to a blur, that intruded itself upon the drab prospect of the sea.

    Cabbages and Kings

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