Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of calcifier.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Off Papua New Guinea and the Italian island of Ischia, where natural carbon-dioxide bubbles from volcanic vents make the sea less alkaline, and off the Yucatan, where underwater springs make seawater actually acidic, studies have shown that at least some kinds of calcifiers still thrive—at least as far down as pH 7.8.

    Taking Fears of Acid Oceans With a Grain of Salt

  • This is because the carbon dioxide dissolves mainly as bicarbonate, which many calcifiers use as raw material for carbonate.

    Taking Fears of Acid Oceans With a Grain of Salt

  • It is now well established that shell or skeleton growth through calcium carbonate precipitation of most calcifiers will be greatly affected by changging ocean pH.

    Ocean acidification

  • Impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs and other marine calcifiers: a guide for future research. 88 p. Boulder, Colorado: Institute for the Study of Society and Environment (ISSE) of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).

    Ocean acidification

  • Impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs and other marine calcifiers - a guide for future research

    Ocean acidification

  • Note, however, that some calcifiers either do not show any response to increasing pCO2 or exhibit a bell-shaped response curve with an optimum rate of calcification at pCO2 values close to current ones and rates that decrease at pCO2 values below and above the current values.

    Ocean acidification

  • There must therefore, be some genetic diversity in calcifiers that allows the species to adapt to changes in CO2 and the accompanying changes in pH, by way of selections within the genetic pool.

    HAnsen and Schmidt: Predicting the Past – Continued « Climate Audit

  • Dave Dardinger and Pat Frank asked some questions and made some statements about that and the role of calcifiers, and there was a discussion of pH measurements in seawater.

    HAnsen and Schmidt: Predicting the Past – Continued « Climate Audit

  • Furthermore, because studies have shown that living calcifiers show shell damage in highly undersaturated environments, I would suspect that undersaturated waters on the banks would affect living benthic forams and coralline algae.

    Hansen and Schmidt: Predicting the Past? « Climate Audit

  • On the basis of their approach of comparing model simulations of past and future marine geochemical changes, the authors infer a future rate of surface-ocean acidification and environmental pressure on marine calcifiers, such as corals, unprecedented in the past 65 million years, and one that challenges the potential for plankton to adapt.

    EcoEarth.Info Environment RSS Newsfeed

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