Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having the form of calx, chalk or lime

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. In the form of chalk or lime.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In the form of chalk or lime.
  • Shaped like a pebble; pebbly; gravelly.
  • Having a projection like a heel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At the same time there may be another unrestrainable ethereal fluid yet unobserved, given out from this explosion, which rends oak trees, bursts stone-walls, lights inflammable substances, and fuses metals, or dissipates them in a calciform smoak, along with which great light and much heat are emitted, or these effects are produced by the heat and light only thus set at liberty by their synchronous and sudden evolution.

    Note XII

  • Whence the ceaseless liberation of oxygen from the water has oxydated or calcined the ores of metals near the surface of the earth, as of manganese, of zinc into lapis calaminaris, of iron into various ochres, and other calciform ores.

    Note XII

  • This acidifying principle is found in all the metallic calces, as in lapis calaminaris, which is a calciform ore of zinc; and in cerussa, which is a calx of lead; two materials which are powerful in healing excoriations, and ulcers, in a short time by their external application.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • I have a calciform ore of copper consisting of the hollow crusts of cubic cells, which has evidently been formed on crystals of fluor, which it has eroded in the same manner as the calamy erodes the calcareous crystals, from whence may be deduced in the same manner, the aqueous solution or diffusion, as well as the recent production of this calciform ore of copper.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • Manganese, and zinc, and sometimes lead, are also found near the surface of the earth, and on that account become combined with vital air and are exhibited in their calciform state.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • As iron is formed near the surface of the earth, it becomes exposed to streams of water and of air more than most other metallic bodies, and thence becomes combined with oxygene, or vital air, and appears very frequently in its calciform state, as in variety of ochres.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • Manganese and calamy are found in beds like iron near the surface of the earth, and in a calciform state, which countenances their modern production.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • The production of iron from the decomposition of vegetable bodies is perpetually presented to our view; the waters oozing from all morasses are chalybeate, and deposit their ochre on being exposed to the air, the iron acquiring a calciform state from its union with oxygene or vital air.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • Add to this the known quantities of air which are combined with the calciform ores, as the ochres of iron, manganese, calamy, grey ore of lead, and some idea may be formed of the great production of air in volcanic eruptions, as mentioned in note on Chunda, Vol.II. and of the perpetual absorptions and evolutions of whole oceans of air from every part of the earth.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • From the cheapness with which a very powerful gunpowder is likely soon to be manufactured from aerated marine acid, or from a new method of forming nitrous acid by means of mangonese or other calciform ores, it may probably in time be applied to move machinery, and supersede the use of steam.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.