Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of calvary.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Much later, during the 15th to 17th centuries, large stone crosses were erected in similar positions in Brittany (France), which were known as "calvaries," Wainwright said.

    News & Record Article Feed

  • There had been formerly on the pathways of Dardilly calvaries built by pious forebears; destroyed on order of the revolutionary proconsul of Lyon, the famous Fouché, the crosses lay in the grass.

    Archive 2008-03-09

  • The cross can be seen throughout the Christian world, from elaborate, gem-encrusted gold altar ornaments to simple wayside calvaries, in handsome stone marketplace crosses, and in the basic floor plan of Christian churches.

    A Handbook of Symbols in Christian Art

  • Pays de Léon is remarkable for the number of its religious monuments, its fine churches, its bone-houses, calvaries, way-side crosses, and shrines.

    Brittany & Its Byways

  • Its churches, calvaries, cemeteries, all silent as death — “A deep, still pool in the ocean of life.”

    Brittany & Its Byways

  • Auray is a good central point for visiting the Celtic remains: — menhirs, dolmens, cromlechs, all of which are as plentiful here as are calvaries, shrines, and churches in Léon.

    Brittany & Its Byways

  • But other churches in the neighbourhood of Morlaix are well worth visiting; churches typical of the Finistère, with their wonderful calvaries, mortuaries and triumphal arches.

    The Argosy Vol. 51, No. 4, April, 1891

  • Tiny rustic villages, with churches humble and unobtrusive, and prominent calvaries, are passed one after the other.

    Normandy, Illustrated, Complete

  • These are flat regions, and there would be no beauty in them if the light radiating from the vapors rising from the fields or the sea did not lend brilliance and relief to the yellow stone villages, the straggling woods or copses, the well-to-do farms, the low hedges, or the tall calvaries at the crossroads.

    Georges Guynemer

  • There were other things on sale also, not for eating and drinking, but for wear and household use -- from pots and pans to rag - carpets and table-linen, from woollen yarn to pictures of the Virgin and little calvaries.

    The Money Master, Volume 3.

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