Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or growing in uncultivated land or open fields.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Relating to open fields or uncultivated land.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Relating to an open field; growing in a field, or open ground.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to an open field; growing in a field or on open ground.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of fields or open country

Etymologies

From Latin campester, of a field, from campus, field.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin campester ("of a field"), from campus ("field"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This contained a liberal amount of sonorous words derived from the Latin, such as "campestral," "lapidescent,"

    History of American Literature

  • Goya room in the basement there was a series of scenes from Spanish life, mostly frolic campestral things, which he did as patterns for tapestries and which came near being enough in their way: the way of that reality which is so far from the reality of Velasquez.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

  • In either case, the wonder of their beauty is the same; and whatever is primitive and sylvan or campestral in the reader's heart is touched by the spells thrown on the simple black lives in these enchanting tales.

    "Mr. Charles W. Chesnutt's Stories."

  • There was not enough Goya abovestairs to satisfy us, but in the Goya room in the basement there was a series of scenes from Spanish life, mostly frolic campestral things, which he did as patterns for tapestries and which came near being enough in their way: the way of that reality which is so far from the reality of Velasquez.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

  • Engelmann and I have been noting the species truly indigenous here which, becoming ruderal or campestral, are increasing in the number of individuals instead of diminishing as the country becomes more settled and forests removed.

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 1

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