Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A biennial Eurasian herb (Carum carvi) in the parsley family, having finely divided leaves and clusters of small, white or pinkish flowers.
  • noun The seedlike fruit of this plant, widely used as a flavoring and seasoning in various foods.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A biennial plant, Carum Carui, of the natural order Umbelliferœ, with a tapering root like a parsnip, which when young is used as food, but has a very strong flavor.
  • noun The Nigella sativa or black caraway, a ranunculaceous plant of southern Europe, the seeds of which are aromatic and used for the same purposes as common caraway.
  • noun Collectively, the seeds of the caraway.
  • noun A kind of sweet cake or comfit containing caraway-seeds.
  • noun A kind of apple.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A biennial plant of the Parsley family (Carum Carui). The seeds have an aromatic smell, and a warm, pungent taste. They are used in cookery and confectionery, and also in medicine as a carminative.
  • noun A cake or sweetmeat containing caraway seeds.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A biennial plant, Carum carvi, native to Europe and Asia, mainly grown for its seed to be used as a culinary spice.
  • noun The seed-like fruit of the caraway plant.
  • noun A cake or sweetmeat containing caraway seeds.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a Eurasian plant with small white flowers yielding caraway seed
  • noun leaves used sparingly in soups and stews

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English carewei, from Old French carvi, caroi, probably from Medieval Latin carvi, carwi, ultimately from Arabic karawyā, from Greek karō.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French carvi, from Medieval Latin carui, from Arabic كمون, probably from Ancient Greek κύμινο

Examples

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.