Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Plural of carex, 2.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The change in the native vegetation of the planted part of the heath was most remarkable, -- more than is generally seen in passing from one quite different soil to another; not only the proportional numbers of the heath plants were wholly changed, but twelve species of plants (not counting grasses and carices) flourished in the plantations, which could not be found on the heath.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 108, October, 1866

  • The wildest of wild hay, made chiefly of carices and rushes, was sold at from two to three hundred dollars per ton on ranches.

    Steep Trails

  • On the margin of the meadow darling linnaea was in its glory; purple panicled grasses in full flower reached over my head, and some of the carices and ferns were almost as tall.

    Travels in Alaska

  • The change in the native vegetation of the planted part of the heath was most remarkable, more than is generally seen in passing from one quite different soil to another: not only the proportional numbers of the heath-plants were wholly changed, but twelve species of plants (not counting grasses and carices) flourished in the plantations, which could not be found on the heath.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 03 (historical)

  • One of the four canoes, which had taken the Indians to the gathering of the Juvias, was filled in great part with that species of reeds (carices) of which the blow-tubes are made.

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • These carices come from the foot of the mountains of Yumariquin and Guanaja.

    Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America

  • Their true home is on the cold table-lands of Thibet and Tartary, or still higher up among the mountain valleys of the Himalayas, where they feed on grass or the smaller species of carices.

    The Plant Hunters Adventures Among the Himalaya Mountains

  • Nor can the benefit thus derived be insignificant, for a considerable [page 390] amount of pollen must be blown from the many wind-fertilised carices, grasses,

    Insectivorous Plants

  • * Drosera in a state of nature cannot fail to profit to a certain extent by this power of digesting pollen, as innumerable grains from the carices, grasses, rumices, fir-trees, and other wind-fertilised plants, which commonly grow in the same neighbourhood, will be inevitably caught by the viscid secretion surrounding the many glands.

    Insectivorous Plants

  • "Since the carices developed so nicely into flax, we have had one great comfort, which we had lost before, in being able to make and use paper.

    The Brick Moon, and Other Stories

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