Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as karyoplasm.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The caryoplasm is the inner and firmer part of the cell, the substance of the nucleus.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 2

  • It bears in the cell and nuclear matter of the penetrating spermatozoon a part of the father's body, and in the protoplasm and caryoplasm of the ovum a part of the mother's body.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The earliest process of inorganic differentiation in the structureless body of the Monera led to its division into two different substances -- the caryoplasm and the cytoplasm.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 2

  • As a rule, in mature and differentiated cells these various parts are so arranged that the protoplasm (like the caryoplasm in the round nucleus) forms a sort of skeleton or framework.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The essential and indispensable element of the nucleus is called nuclein (or caryoplasm); that of the cell body is called plastin (or cytoplasm).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The nucleus (or caryon), which is usually of a simple roundish form, is quite structureless at first (especially in very young cells), and composed of homogeneous nuclear matter or caryoplasm (Figure 1.2 k).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • These are what we call the "cytodes" (cytos = cell), certain living, independent beings, consisting only of a particle of plasson -- an albuminoid substance, which is not yet differentiated into caryoplasm and cytoplasm, but combines the properties of both.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • Nano particles can penetrate the membrane of pulmonary epithelial cells and lodge in the cytoplasm and caryoplasm, as well as aggregate around the membrane of red blood cells and exert toxicity.

    Nanotechnology Law Report

  • (caryoplasm), and the second the body of the cell (cytoplasm).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

  • The indirect (or "mitotic") cleavage is much more frequent; in this the caryoplasm of the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the cell-body act upon each other in a peculiar way, with a partial dissolution (caryolysis), the formation of knots and loops (mitosis), and a movement of the halved plasma-particles towards two mutually repulsive poles of attraction (caryokinesis, Figure 1.11.) (FIGURE 1.10.

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 1

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