Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • French Vocabulary la casquette = cap le camion = truck le sécateur = pruning shears le gant = glove voilà!

    Harvest

  • French Vocabulary la casquette = cap le camion =truck le sécateur = pruning shears le gant = glove voilà!

    Harvest

  • "Today," says the political reporter Blandine Grosjean, of the daily national newspaper Libération, "assimilation means getting not a beret but a casquette américaine" -- as the French have come to call those cheap and omnipresent baseball caps.

    The Crescent and the Tricolor

  • Once it was the Regent Street of Paris -- a sort of Rue de la Paix -- lounged along by the gallants of the days of Henri IV., and not unvisited by the red-heeled marquises of the Regent d'Orleans's time; now it sees nothing more _recherché_ than the cap of the grisette or the poissarde, as the case may be, nor any thing more august than the casquette of the

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXXVI. October, 1843. Vol. LIV.

  • He in the steel corselet, with high cheek-bones, ferret, cold eyes, and high, thin nose, its nostrils drawn back in an aristocratic sniff -- camps were evil-smelling in those days -- his casquette resting on his arm, was the progenitor of him with the Louis XIV. curls; he of the early nineteenth century, with a face like Marshal Ney's, was the progenitor of him with the mustache and imperial of the sixties.

    The Last Shot

  • Ever since he had removed the black casquette, a wild idea, of a dramatic quality irresistible, had formed itself in my brain.

    Master Tales of Mystery, Volume 3

  • In the black casquette, later, they discovered a hole two inches wide, torn by the jagged edge of a broken stay.

    Master Tales of Mystery, Volume 3

  • Yesterday, at the station, I saw a sick Zouave nursing a German summer casquette.

    My War Experiences in Two Continents

  • So, when Ninette brought my perambulator to the gate, there was Père, in his veston and casquette, determined to go with me and see me through.

    On the Edge of the War Zone From the Battle of the Marne to the Entrance of the Stars and Stripes

  • At last came the King, disguised, his whiskers shaved off, a sort of casquette on his head, and a coarse overcoat, and immense goggles over his eyes.

    The Letters of Queen Victoria, Vol 2 (of 3), 1844-1853 A Selection from her Majesty's correspondence between the years 1837 and 1861

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