Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Steel which has been rendered homogeneous by remelting in crucibles or pots: for this reason sometimes called crucible or homogeneous steel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In 1845, Perry received a cast-steel, double-barreled muzzleloader from Morgan James, a New York gunmaker, which provoked "more than my usual fall fever for a deer hunt."

    The Toughest Deer Hunter Ever

  • In 1845, Perry received a cast-steel, double-barreled muzzleloader from Morgan James, a New York gunmaker, which provoked "more than my usual fall fever for a deer hunt."

    The Toughest Deer Hunter Ever

  • At three feet, the group struck a cross-pattern of two lengths of rusted cast-steel steam pipe, each three feet long.

    Shadow of the Sentinel

  • Flat, usually planed cast-steel plate or granite plate used as support for scribing work, preferably with height gauges.

    3. Accessories

  • Strong and flat cast-steel plates which are held by a stand or put on a work bench and are used for most hammering work.

    2. Tools and accessories

  • Lloyd Haigh presented several samples of very good wire, apparently cast-steel, of three different stocks.

    The Great Bridge

  • The piston is of cast-steel, and the rod is of iron, 12 inches in diameter.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 303, October 22, 1881

  • Here was a tool constructed with a skeleton iron body, having a curved wooden handle; the plane iron is of the finest cast-steel; the cover is fitted with an ingenious trigger at the top, which, with a screw below the iron, admits of the plane iron being removed for sharpening and setting without the aid of the hammer, and with the greatest ease.

    Woodworking Tools 1600-1900

  • During the shut-down the broken plates were reinforced temporarily with steel ribs and reinforced concrete (Fig. 1, Plate LXXIII) which, on completion of the work, were replaced by cast-steel segments, as described elsewhere.

    Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, vol. LXVIII, Sept. 1910 The New York Tunnel Extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The East River Tunnels. Paper No. 1159

  • After rising, we had ten minutes to wash our faces and hands, -- a period by the experience of mankind demonstrably insufficient, where the soap is of that kind very properly denominated cast-steel (though purists have a different spelling), and you have to break an inch of ice to get into the available region of your water-pitcher.

    Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.