Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The guard or defence of a castle.
  • n. A tax or imposition on a dwelling within a certain distance of a castle, for the purpose of maintaining watch and ward in it; castleward.
  • n. A feudal tenure, obliging the tenant to perform service within the realm, without limitation of time.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The guard or defense of a castle.
  • n. A tax or imposition an a dwelling within a certain distance of a castle, for the purpose of maintaining watch and ward in it; castle-ward.
  • n. A feudal tenure, obliging the tenant to perform service within the realm, without limitation of time.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The guard which defends a castle.
  • n. A feudal charge or duty due from a tenant to his lord, payable either in personal service in defending the lord's castle or by commutations in money in certain cases.
  • n. The tenure or hold which such a tenant had on the land granted him by his lord.
  • n. The circuit around a castle subject to taxation for its maintenance.
  • n. Also called castle-ward.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A knight taken or sent on military service shall be excused from castle-guard for the period of this service.

    The Magna Carta

  • No constable shall compel any knight to give money in lieu of castle-guard, when he is willing to perform it in his own person, or

    The Magna Carta

  • The shire fee was the southern part; under a sheriff appointed by the chief Lord: the chief landowners owed suit and service -- _i. e._, they attended and were under the jurisdiction of the shire court held monthly in the castle enclosure, and each owed a fixed amount of military service -- especially the duty of "castle-guard" -- supplying the garrison and keeping the castle in repair.

    Mediæval Wales Chiefly in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries: Six Popular Lectures

  • No constable shall distrain any knight to give money for castle-guard, if he himself will do it in his person, or by another able man, in case he cannot do it through any reasonable cause.

    Civil Government in the United States Considered with Some Reference to Its Origins

  • The royal castles were scarcely less troublesome: for, as everything was then in tenure, the governor held his place by the tenure of castle-guard; and thus, instead of a simple officer, subject to his pleasure, the king had to deal with a feudal tenant, secure against him by law, if he performed his services, and by force, if he was unwilling to perform them.

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 07 (of 12)

  • In Leland's time, several gentlemen of the county held their lands by _castle-guard_, being bound to repair and defend the fortifications of this castle. [

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 19, No. 553, June 23, 1832

  • Don Juan informed him that he and Valasquez had seen through a chasm in the rock that concealed them, some of the castle-guard prowling the mountains, as if they suspected a hidden enemy. — “They were within a few paces,” said Valasquez, “of the cavern; and we heard them plainly say, they supposed, by the delay of the governor’s coming to the castle, he had had hot work on his hands.

    Cava of Toledo; or, the Gothic Princess

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