Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of a word, capable of being employed by itself as a term, such as "man", unlike "many".

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Capable of being employed by itself as a term; -- said of a word.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Conveying a whole term, that is, either the subject or the predicate of a proposition, in a single word. Sometimes incorrectly written categoreumatic or cathegreumatic.
  • n. In logic, a word which is capable of being employed by itself as a term.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of a term or phrase capable of standing as the subject or (especially) the predicate of a proposition

Etymologies

From Ancient Greek κατηγόρημα (katēgorēma, "a predicate"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The syncategorematic words were naturally seen as indicating the structure or form of the proposition, while the categorematic words supplied its “matter.”

    Logical Constants

  • In sum, it is not clear how the distinction between categorematic and syncategorematic terms, so natural in the framework of a term logic, can be extended to a post-Fregean function/argument conception of propositional structure.

    Logical Constants

  • However, once we have thrown out the old subject/predicate model, we can no longer identify the categorematic terms with the subject and predicate terms, as the medievals did.

    Logical Constants

  • It is valid for any uniform substitution of its categorematic terms.

    The Statue of a Writer

  • His idea is that the syncategoreumata must have some sort of signification, but not the same as the categorematic words.

    Peter of Spain

  • The latter are defined as words that do not have a definitive meaning on their own, but acquire one only in combination with other, categorematic words.

    Peter of Spain

  • Buridan and other late medieval logicians proposed that categorematic expressions constitute the

    Logical Truth

  • (They are of course categorematic in the grammatical sense, in which prepositions and adverbs are equally clearly syncategorematic.)

    Logical Truth

  • Part I goes on to lay out a fairly detailed theory of terms, including the distinctions between (a) categorematic and syncategorematic terms, (b) abstract and concrete terms, and (c) absolute and connotative terms.

    William of Ockham

  • In making this claim, Brentano relies on the distinction between categorematic and syncategorematic expressions, i.e., between terms that purport to denote entities, and expressions like “is”, “and”,

    Brentano's Theory of Judgement

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