Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An exhibition of domestic animals for prizes, with a view to the promotion of their improvement and increase: in the United States usually combined with a sort of agricultural fair.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I shut my eyes now and look back to my native town in Massachusetts, and I see the cattle-show ground on the mountain-top; I can see the horse-sheds there.

    Acres of Diamonds

  • I can see that company of soldiers that had re-enlisted marching up on that cattle-show ground.

    Acres of Diamonds

  • He will prove to you that the cattle of Rosa Bonheur are those of the fields, while he will object to Landseer that his beasts are those of the guinea cattle-show.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

  • I close my eyes now; I look back through the years to 1863; I can see my native town in the Berkshire Hills, I can see that cattle-show ground filled with people; I can see the church there and the town hall crowded, and hear bands playing, and see flags flying and handkerchiefs steaming -- well do I recall at this moment that day.

    Russell H. Conwell

  • Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and Thomas Jefferson, into a great barracoon -- a cattle-show of human beings, an emporium, of which the staple articles of merchandise are the flesh and blood, the bones and sinews of immortal man.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Jefferson, into a great barracoon -- a cattle-show of human beings, an emporium, of which the staple articles of merchandise are the flesh and blood, the bones and sinews of immortal man.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • RICHARD HENRY LEE, and THOMAS JEFFERSON, into a great barracoon -- a cattle-show of human beings, an emporium, of which the staple articles of merchandise are the flesh and blood, the bones and sinews of immortal man.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • On Wednesday there was a cattle-show in the village, of which I would give a description, if it had possessed any picturesque points.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 107, September, 1866

  • Arrived in Waltham, to his great vexation, it appeared, after much inquiry, that Captain Grant lived full three miles from the station, -- and what was worse, every omnibus, hack, buggy, and dog-cart was engaged for a muster in one direction or a cattle-show in another.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 21, July, 1859

  • The good lady enlarged volubly on her destitution of help, and how, if she had any such as we get now-a-days, they were more plague than profit, -- how Laura was getting ready to go with Frank to the cattle-show, and she herself was likely to be the only living mortal in the house for the rest of the day.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 21, July, 1859

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