Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or quality of being causeless.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state of being causeless.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state of being causeless.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Reader! when you behold an aspect for whose constant gloom and frown you cannot account, whose unvarying cloud exasperates you by its apparent causelessness, be sure that there is a canker somewhere, and a canker not the less deeply corroding because concealed.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • Such causelessness would bind the Soul under an even sterner compulsion, no longer master of itself, but at the mercy of movements apart from will and cause.

    The Six Enneads.

  • When you behold an aspect for whose constant gloom and frown you cannot account, whose unvarying cloud exasperates you by its apparent causelessness, be sure that there is a canker somewhere, and a canker not the less deeply corroding because concealed.

    Daily Strength for Daily Needs

  • Such were the pretexts behind which the first president and his friends prepared for a carnage which, for causelessness and atrocity, finds few parallels on the page of history.

    The Rise of the Hugenots, Vol. 1 (of 2)

  • He meant the sense of profound mystery, the revolt against utter causelessness, which had tormented to no clearness so many generations of minds.

    Cytherea

  • The causelessness of all this fuff stirred my own bile.

    David Balfour, a sequel to Kidnapped.

  • But the third has its roots apparently in mere haphazard and causelessness, and isn't explicable by any means whatsoever, and yet is far and away the violentest of the three.

    My Friend Prospero

  • In the story, she wears an aspect of singular causelessness, and Rip's devotion to the drinking-can is barely hinted: the marvellous tenderness, too, and joyful sorrow of his return after the twenty years 'sleep, are apparently not even suspected by the writer.

    A Study Of Hawthorne

  • With just a word of introduction, Godfrey read Carlyle's translation of that finest of Jean Paul's dreams in which he sets forth the condition of a godless universe all at once awakened to the knowledge of the causelessness of its own existence.

    Mary Marston

  • But it must be confessed that a study of errors detracts very much from the apparent certainty of conjectures, the causelessness of the blunders warning us off the hope of restoring, by general principles or by discovery of causes of error.

    The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.] Introduction and Publisher's Advertising

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