Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In Roman antiquity, a body of knights or horsemen of the patrician order, numbering originally, according to tradition, 300, first organized by Romulus, 100 being selected, 10 from each curia, from each of the three tribes.
  • [capitalized] An old division of domestic dogs, including swift-footed kinds, of which the greyhound is the type: distinguished from Sagaces and Pugnaces.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • 'pugnaces' and the 'sagaces' are mentioned; but the 'celeres' -- the swift-footed -- are not spoken of as a peculiar breed.

    The Dog

  • Non fuit apud mortales ullum excellentius certamen, non inter celeres celerrimo, non inter robustos robustissimo,

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • In defuncti locum eum jussit subrogari, qui inter majores virtute reliquis praeiret; non fuit apud mortales ullum excellentius certamen, aut cujus victoria magis esset expetenda, non enim inter celeres, celerrimo, non inter robustos robustissimo,

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Si celeres quatit pennas — you know the rest — no?

    The Virginians

  • “Good-bye to our fortune, and bad luck go with her — I puff the prostitute away — Si celeres quatit pennas, you remember what we used to say at Grey Friars — resign quae dedit, et mea virtute me involve, probamque pauperiem sine dote quaero.”

    The Newcomes

  • Nor does the heinousness of the circumstance excite less violent emotions at Rome than it had done at Collatia; accordingly they run from all parts of the city into the forum, whither, when they came, the public crier summoned them to attend the tribune of the celeres, with which office Brutus happened to be at that time vested.

    The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08

  • A medical writer of some note, whose two works on acute (_celeres passiones_) and chronic (_tardae_) diseases have reached us, is CAELIUS

    The History of Roman Literature From the earliest period to the death of Marcus Aurelius

  • But there came a day, and it came soon, when Horace, saw that triumphs gained in this way were of little value, and when he was anxious that his friends should join with him in consigning his smart and scurril lines (_celeres et criminosos Iambos_) to oblivion.

    Horace

  • "Good-bye to our fortune, and bad luck go with her -- I puff the prostitute away -- Si celeres quatit pennas, you remember what we used to say at Grey Friars -- resign quae dedit, et mea virtute me involve, probamque pauperiem sine dote quaero."

    The Newcomes

  • He has organised a band of soldiers, called _Danites_, a sacred battalion -- the _celeres_ of Romulus -- these are all _comites_ or counts; their chiefs are _conductors_, or dukes.

    Travels and Adventures of Monsieur Violet

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