Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having a head; applied chiefly to the Cephalata, a division of mollusks.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having a head; -- applied chiefly to the Cephalata, a division of mollusks.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having a head: opposed to acephalous.
  • Pertaining to or resembling the Cephalata: as, the cephalous Mollusca.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ancient Greek

Examples

  • As the word _archetype_ was borrowed from old metaphysical ideas dating back to the time of Plato, he took care to state that what he meant by it was no more than a form embodying all that could be affirmed equally respecting every single kind of cephalous mollusc, and by no means an "idea" upon which it could be supposed that animal forms had been modelled.

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • As the word archetype was borrowed from old metaphysical ideas dating back to the time of Plato, he took care to state that what he meant by it was no more than a form embodying all that could be affirmed equally respecting every single kind of cephalous mollusc, and by no means an “idea” upon which it could be supposed that animal forms had been modelled.

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • Amid the old women were a few little girls of thirteen or fourteen, monstrously deformed, with bleary eyes; one of them had her nose completely eaten away, with nothing but a hole like a wound left in its place; another was hydro-cephalous, with so thin a neck that it seemed the slightest movement would snap it and send her head rolling from her shoulders.

    The Quest

  • He shewed how the widely different groups of cephalous molluscs could be conceived as modifications of this structure, and extended the conception so as to cover all other molluscs.

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • The anatomy of many of the cephalous molluscs was known, but the relation of structures present in one to structures present in another group had not been settled.

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • The shell-fish with which he dealt specially were those distinguished as cephalous, because, unlike creatures such as the oyster and mussel, they had something readily comparable with the head of vertebrates.

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • Having had no opportunity to make such embryological studies for himself, he fell back on numerous accounts of development by Kölliker, Van Beneden, Gegenbauer, and others, and so gradually arrived at a conception of what he called the "archetype" of the cephalous molluscs.

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • Having had no opportunity to make such embryological studies for himself, he fell back on numerous accounts of development by Koelliker, Van Beneden, Gegenbauer, and others, and so gradually arrived at a conception of what he called the “archetype” of the cephalous molluscs.

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • From knowledge gained in this fashion, and from ordinary dissection of a number of common snails, cephalopods, and pteropods, he was able to describe in a very complete way the anatomical structure of cephalous molluscs.

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • He was desirous of exercising his culture on it, and wished to ascertain whether the skull was bracchy-cephalous, dolichophalous, or polycephalous.

    The Book of the Bush Containing Many Truthful Sketches Of The Early Colonial Life Of Squatters, Whalers, Convicts, Diggers, And Others Who Left Their Native Land And Never Returned

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