Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A nitrogenous substance closely resembling diastase, obtained from bran, and possessing the power of converting starch into dextrin, sugar, and lactic acid.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A nitrogenous substance closely resembling diastase, obtained from bran, and possessing the power of converting starch into dextrin, sugar, and lactic acid.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A nitrogenous substance obtained from bran, closely resembling diastase in its power of transforming starch into dextrin, sugar, and lactic acid.

Etymologies

cereal +‎ -in (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • _Bread_ -- all over a day old: brown; graham; gluten; rye; zwieback; crackers; cracked wheat; corn meal; hominy; wheaten and graham grits; rolled rye and oats; granose; cerealin; macaroni with toasted bread-crumbs; farina, boiled with milk; Milkine; Horlick's or Mellin's food.

    Intestinal Ills Chronic Constipation, Indigestion, Autogenetic Poisons, Diarrhea, Piles, Etc. Also Auto-Infection, Auto-Intoxication, Anemia, Emaciation, Etc. Due to Proctitis and Colitis

  • Under brewery No. 3 are given determinations for ales prepared from 80 per cent of malt and 20 per cent of cerealin; 78 per cent of malt and 22 per cent of cerealin; 75 per cent of malt and 25 per cent of cerealin; and 65 per cent of malt, 28 per cent of cerealin, and 7 per cent of brewer's sugar.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • The main object of this investigation was to find, if possible, a means of distinguishing beers and ales made entirely from malt from those made from malt together with other cereal products, such as rice, corn, and cerealin.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • Unfortunately, there is no all-malt product of this brewery to compare with the brews made from a portion of cerealin or from cerealin and brewer's sugar.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • That is, in the second product there is, in the same volume of liquid, the extractive material from 68 pounds of malt and 23 pounds of cerealin, while in the first product there is present the extractive material from only 58 pounds of malt.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • The most satisfactory way to have tested this question of the effect of raw materials on the finished product would have been to make a series of worts with exactly the same percentage of solids, some of pure malt and others of mixtures of pure malt and corn, rice, and cerealin; then a direct comparison between the results would have shown the effects of these various materials.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • In none of the malt-and-corn beers is the ash, protein, or phosphoric acid so high as the minimum found in the all-malt beers, and the same is true of the mixtures of malt and cerealin and of malt, brewer's sugar, and cerealin.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • -- _Analyses of porter worts made from malt, cerealin, and brewer's sugar, and of the porters made from these worts.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • In order to show the effects on the finished beers or ales of the use of corn, rice, cerealin, and brewer's sugar as substitutes for malt in the worts, Table VII has been prepared, giving the results of analyses of a number of brews made in different breweries and from varying kinds and amounts of raw materials.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

  • This, however, can be readily explained when it is considered that in the case of brewery No. 2 in the all-malt beers (sample No. 22017-D) only 58 pounds of malt were used in the preparation of a barrel of beer containing 31 gallons; while in the case of sample No. 29512-B there were used, in preparing a barrel of similar capacity, 68 pounds of malt and 23 pounds of cerealin.

    A Study Of American Beers and Ales

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