Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The driver of a chariot.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who drives or directs a chariot.
  • noun [capitalized] The constellation Auriga (which see).
  • noun A serranoid fish, Dules auriga, having a filamentous dorsal spine like a coach-whip. It is a rare Brazilian and Caribbean sea-fish. Also called coachman.
  • To drive a chariot, or as if in a chariot; act the part of a charioteer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who drives a chariot.
  • noun (Astron.) A constellation. See Auriga, and Wagones.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A person who drives a chariot.
  • verb intransitive To drive a chariot.
  • verb transitive To drive someone in a chariot.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a conspicuous constellation in the northern hemisphere; between Great Bear and Orion at edge of Milky Way
  • noun the driver of a chariot

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From chariot +‎ -eer - French charioteur

Examples

  • For Plato, the soul was an Ideal, a kind of living idea, that existed in a state of transmutability—it could change all the time—until it entered the darkness of the body, becoming “the pilot of the body, as a charioteer is the pilot of the horses who pull his chariot.”

    The Wonder of Children

  • For Plato, the soul was an Ideal, a kind of living idea, that existed in a state of transmutability—it could change all the time—until it entered the darkness of the body, becoming “the pilot of the body, as a charioteer is the pilot of the horses who pull his chariot.”

    The Wonder of Children

  • My charioteer was a far better specimen of the present, than foundations of long walls, ruined temples, and statues without noses, can possibly be of the past.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 344, June, 1844

  • The charioteer was a little diamond-headed fellow who straddled the neck of the dragon and moved the levers that made it go.

    The Lost Princess of Oz

  • For as the reins give no trouble to the charioteer, but the charioteer is the cruise of all the mischief through his not holding them properly: (and therefore do they often exact a penalty of him, entangling themselves with him, and dragging him on, and compelling him to partake in their own mishap:) so is it also in the case before us.

    NPNF1-12. Saint Chrysostom: Homilies on the Epistles of Paul to the Corinthians

  • The charioteer was a little, diamond-headed fellow who straddled the neck of the dragon and moved the levers that made it go.

    The Lost Princess of Oz

  • The charioteer was a little diamond-headed fellow who straddled the neck of the dragon and moved the levers that made it go.

    The Lost Princess of Oz

  • The charioteer was a Nubian, wearing bracelets of gold, as well as otherwise richly attired.

    The pillar of fire, or, Israel in bondage

  • When he had cut only a little, the Overseer entered the Judgment Hall, saying: "The two apostles tricked Jude and crawled under the barrier, and they shot back the bolts of the gate of the Chariot House and called a charioteer to take them to Heaven.

    My Neighbors Stories of the Welsh People

  • "Yea, the charioteer is the son of the King of Gabra, and it is

    The Coming of Cuculain

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