Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of charioteer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act or art of driving a chariot.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The old Trojan type of charioteering, still in use to this day among the Cyrenaeans, he abolished; before his time the Medes, the Syrians, the Arabians, and all Asiatics generally, used their chariots in the same way as the Cyrenaeans do now.

    Cyropaedia

  • And there are many similar examples in charioteering and other things, from which we may learn that those who make the left side weaker than the right act contrary to nature.

    Laws

  • Shall I practice charioteering, or shall I practice archery?

    The Analects

  • The four charioteering factions were funded by private sponsorship, but there was always talk of them being state run; it might never happen but Famia and all his colleagues had developed fixed prejudices in advance.

    Two For The Lions

  • So it was settled that Aunt Deborah and Gertrude being safely packed up in the close carriage, I should accompany Lady Horsingham, who was rather proud of her charioteering skill, and drove stiff and upright, as if she had swallowed the poker -- never looking to the right or left, or allowing her attention to wander for an instant from the ponies she had undertaken to control.

    Kate Coventry An Autobiography

  • It is then that the charioteer arose, and he put on his hero's dress of charioteering.

    Táin Bó Cúalnge. English

  • His hand brought the circlet of red-yellow, as though it were a plate of red-gold, of refined gold smelted over the edge of an anvil, to his brow, as a sign of his charioteering, in distinction to his master.

    Táin Bó Cúalnge. English

  • [Note: Gloss incorporated in text: 'i.e. to direct his horses, in his left hand, for the great power of his charioteering.']

    Táin Bó Cúalnge. English

  • This was his hero's dress of charioteering that he put on: his soft tunic of skin, light and airy, well-turned [Note: Lit. 'kneaded.'], made of skin, sewn, of deer-skin, so that it did not restrain the movement of his hands outside.

    Táin Bó Cúalnge. English

  • This was the hero's dress of charioteering that he put on: his soft tunic of deer skin, so that it did not restrain the movement of his hands outside.

    English Literature for Boys and Girls

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