Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person who, or a thing that cheers
  • n. A glass of spirit with warm water

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who cheers; one who, or that which, gladdens.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who gives cheer or utters cheers; one who or that which gladdens.
  • n. A glass of spirit and warm water.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a spectator who shouts encouragement

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • DR STEVE HAGEMOSER, TREATS PTSD VICTIMS IN IOWA: We don't use the word cheerer (ph) with our veterans, but we do like to let them know the truth that there is life after PTSD.

    CNN Transcript Dec 13, 2005

  • I don't think he quite got close, though - for every cheerer at the press screening there was at least one booer, and the battle was on as the credits rolled.

    GreenCine Daily: Berlinale Dispatch. 300.

  • The bard, as in duty bound, has addressed three long stanzas to Vich Ian Vohr of the Banners, enumerating all his great properties, and not forgetting his being a cheerer of the harper and bard — “a giver of bounteous gifts.”

    Waverley

  • Fanny would certainly believe him so at least, and must find that her estimation of him was higher than ever when he appeared as the attendant, supporter, cheerer of a suffering brother.

    Mansfield Park

  • I put the files and the video aside, then dished up some spaghetti and settled down with it and a tape of Airplane! — my all-time favorite lunatic comedy movie and cheerer-upper.

    The Shape of Dread

  • Hafiz can never be the guide, though he may be the cheerer of mortals, adding more to the gayety than to the wisdom of life.

    The Persian Literature, Comprising The Shah Nameh, The Rubaiyat, The Divan, and The Gulistan, Volume 2

  • Frank said nothing, but his pitying face spoke for him; and the sick man, evidently touched by it, went on in a cheerer tone:

    Harper's Young People, March 30, 1880 An Illustrated Weekly

  • "You're an excellent 'cheerer-up,'" said Ann, later on, when he was going.

    The Vision of Desire

  • She was not only, as a devoted wife, a cheerer of his heart, but, as a woman of accomplishment and ability, she was a companion for his mind.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 37, November, 1860

  • This, and some other desultory conversation, served as a ‘shoeing-horn’ to draw on another cup of ale and another cheerer, as Dinmont termed it in his country phrase, of brandy and water.

    Chapter XXIV

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