Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A cigar with square-cut ends.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A cigar with square-cut ends

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of cigar, originally brought from Manila, in the Philippine Islands; now often made of inferior or adulterated tobacco.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A kind of cigar not pointed at either end, and thicker at one end than at the other. Cheroots were first made at Manila in the Philippine islands.
  • n. Same as shaya-root.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a cigar with both ends cut flat

Etymologies

French cheroute, ultimately from Tamil curruṭṭu, from curi, to be spiral.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Probably from Portuguese charuto ("cigar"), from Tamil curuttu ("roll (of tobacco)"), from curul ("roll"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A Manila cheroot is between his lips – the fragrance of one never fails to call up his image – and he caresses an unamiable little dog which he fondly loves.

    Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910

  • Aidan masked his surprise in bored cynicism before forestalling the queasy stomach churn of questions by lighting a cheroot on the candle flame.

    Earl of Durkness

  • For the faint tang of cheroot smoke and bay rum to tease her nose.

    Earl of Durkness

  • His tone held a whiplash violence that had Danvers cringing, the wrinkled nose and disapproving glare at the unfashionable cheroot wiped from a startled face.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Aidan fought his panic with a long, slow drag on his cheroot.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Pulled a cheroot from his pocket, bending to light it.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Lit a cheroot from a nearby candle, inhaling on a lung-soothing drag.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Instead, pulling a cheroot from his pocket, he lit it from the hearth fire.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Alone, he lit a cheroot to steady his shaking hands.

    Earl of Durkness

  • The combined scents of bay rum and cheroot smoke tickling her nose.

    Earl of Durkness

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