Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A coward.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Read again this sentence to the chicken-heart patriots who are easily manipulated by war profiteers and their agents.

    USA-Inc Supports Sunni and Shiite Terrorists

  • Read again this sentence to the chicken-heart patriots who are easily manipulated by war profiteers and their agents.

    NineTeen Proposals for Obama and Biden

  • She's as much a gentle chicken-heart as you are, my wicked Albert -- in her own way.

    Destination Brain

  • "Why, you chicken-heart, I'll wager a thimbleful of grog, that such a tailor as you are in the water can't for the life of you swim but to the buoy there."

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 20, No. 579, December 8, 1832

  • But this evening there was a kind of defiance about him; he was determined to dare the old warrior-statesman, and the slanderous Banner -- and his own "chicken-heart," too.

    The Heart of Old Hickory and Other Stories of Tennessee

  • By noon the family reassembled at dinner-table, where Mr. Bessemer ate his chicken-heart -- after Travis had thrice reminded him of it -- and expressed himself as to the sermon and the minister's theology: sometimes to his daughter and sometimes to himself.

    Blix

  • "If he's as much stunned with the lick and fuddled with the rum as he had the look of being, he won't think of the knife till he's gone so far he'll be afraid to come back after it to such a place by himself -- chicken-heart!"

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

  • "And Carloman is a chicken-heart," continued Richard, unheeding.

    The Little Duke

  • "Why, Morrison, you must have a chicken-heart to be frightened at a blue pigeon!" said Corbett, laughing and looking out of the window; "at all events, he has come back again, and there he is sitting by the white one."

    The Three Cutters

  • "Why, Morrison, you must have a chicken-heart to be frightened at a blue pigeon," said Corbett, laughing, and looking out of the window; "at all events, he has come back again, and there he is sitting by the white one."

    Peter Simple; and, The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2

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