Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See choragus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The leader of a chorus in Ancient Greece
  • noun The leader of a group (especially of performers)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek χορηγός (chorēgós).

Examples

  • The benefactor of a chorus was called a choregus, and generally was a wealthy man who paid a teacher and trainer to drill the chorus.

    Ask MetaFilter

  • *] The five public judges announce their decision: an ivy wreath to the victorious poet; to his "choregus" (the rich man who has provided his chorus and who shares his glory) the right to set up a monumnet in honor of the victory.

    A Day in Old Athens; a Picture of Athenian Life

  • At Lacedaemon the choregus himself played on the flute; and it was so common at

    Politics: A Treatise on Government

  • Athens that almost every freeman understood it, as is evident from the tablet which Thrasippus dedicated when he was choregus; but afterwards they rejected it as dangerous; having become better judges of what tended to promote virtue and what did not.

    Politics: A Treatise on Government

  • Therefore go and sacrifice the sheep in the house, cut off the legs and bring them here; thus the carcase will be saved for the choregus.

    Peace

  • At Athens the the leitourgia was the public service performed by the wealthier citizens at their own expense, such as the office of gymnasiarch, who superintended the gymnasium, that of choregus, who paid the singers of a chorus in the theatre, that of the hestiator, who gave a banquet to his tribe, of the trierarchus, who provided a warship for the state.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The choregus paid the expenses of a chorus at the Dionysiac (and certain other) festivals.

    The Public Orations of Demosthenes, volume 2

  • Demosthenes was choregus in 348, and trierarch in 363, 359, and 357.

    The Public Orations of Demosthenes, volume 2

  • Such burdens as the duties of choregus, trierarch, &c., might be voluntarily undertaken, as they were by

    The Public Orations of Demosthenes, volume 2

  • 'Twas Demoteles the choregus, O Dionysus, who dedicated this tripod, and this statue of thee, the dearest of the blessed gods.

    Theocritus Bion and Moschus Rendered into English Prose

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.