Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to, constituting, or consisting of choriambs: as, a choriambic foot, verse, or movement.
  • noun A foot constituting a choriamb, or a verse consisting of choriambs.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Pertaining to a choriamb.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or relating to a choriamb.
  • noun A choriamb.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin choriambicus, from Ancient Greek.

Examples

  • All of it crammed into iambic pentameter my forays into choriambic septameter always failed, for reasons that only later became clear.

    Allan Jenkins' Desirable Roasted Coffee

  • All of it crammed into iambic pentameter my forays into choriambic septameter always failed, for reasons that only later became clear.

    Allan Jenkins' Desirable Roasted Coffee

  • Before this are the lyrics, chiefly in the phalaecian eleven-syllabled verse which Catullus made so peculiarly his own, but in iambic, sapphic, choriambic, and other metres also, winding up with the fine epithalamium written for the marriage of his friends,

    Latin Literature

  • The scene of the trial in the great synclinorium of Greeba Castle -- exhibiting contemporaneous carboniferous tuffs, soft argillaceous rocks with choriambic fossils as well as later dolerite dykes, amid which the feline amenities of the Princess were illustrated with miraculous agility by Miss Agneesh

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, December 15, 1920

  • And what rhythm -- be it Sapphic, or choriambic, or Ionic a minore -- is to be compared with the symphonic poetry of a shapely female balanced upon one delicate toe on the bristling back of a fiery, untamed palfrey that whoops round and round to the music of the band, the plaudits of the public, and the still, small voice of the dyspeptic gent announcing a minstrel show "under this canvas after the performance, which is not yet half completed?"

    Second Book of Tales

  • The choriambic I thought might be exchanged for a heroic stanza, in which the first line should rhyme with the fourth, the second with the third, a kind of "In

    The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace

  • Beyond the anapest, the tragedies of Seneca never ascend higher than a sophic or choriambic verse, which, when monotonously repeated, is very disagreeable to the ear.] than that of the Latin comic writers generally.

    Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.