Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of chrysolite.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dark green varieties are known as alexandarites, while pale to green yellow stones are called chrysolites.

    Zolar’s Magick Of Color

  • Dark green varieties are known as alexandarites, while pale to green yellow stones are called chrysolites.

    Zolar’s Magick Of Color

  • Dark green varieties are known as alexandarites, while pale to green yellow stones are called chrysolites.

    Zolar’s Magick Of Color

  • Dark green varieties are known as alexandarites, while pale to green yellow stones are called chrysolites.

    Zolar’s Magick Of Color

  • So Janshah threw him down some two hundred of the stones, which were all rubies,544 chrysolites and other gems of price; after which he called out to him, saying, ‘Show me the way down and I will throw thee as many more.’

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Whereat said one and all, ‘How are we able to do this thing thou hast commanded, and whence shall we get the chrysolites and rubies and pearls whereof thou speakest?’

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Moreover, with us are coral and pearls and chrysolites and emeralds and rubies and other gems, and I will fill thee the basket, wherein thou bringest me the fruit, with precious stones of the jewels of the sea. 244 What sayest thou to this, O my brother?

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Thereon were depicted all manner of animals such as beasts and birds, spangled with precious stones, rubies, emeralds, chrysolites and balasses and every kind of precious metal.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Here I saw the damsel seated upon a throne of gold, under a canopy of brocade, girt round by a garden full of trees of gold, whose fruits were jewels of price, such as rubies and chrysolites, pearls and coral.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Beholding this I marvelled with great marvel and thought the case mighty wondrous; then entering the citadel in a flutter of fear and dazed with surprise and affright, I found it long and wide, about equalling Al – Medinah167 in point of size; and therein were lofty palaces laid out in pavilions all built of gold and silver and inlaid with many-coloured jewels and jacinths and chrysolites and pearls.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.