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Examples

  • Adair gives the following description of the same game: "The warriors have another favorite game, called _'chungke'_, which, with propriety of language may be called 'Running hard labour.'

    Indian Games : an historical research

  • Wyejah's scarlet attire, its fringes tasseled with the spurs of the wild turkey, rendered his lithe figure strongly marked against these illusory ethereal tints as he sped abreast with Otasite along the level sandy stretch of the chungke-yard.

    The Frontiersmen

  • Otasite, however, was all unaware of the spell cast upon him when he came into the chungke-yard the next day, arrayed in his finest garb, the white dressed doeskin glittering in the sun, his necklaces of beads, his belt of wolf fangs, his flying feet in their white moccasins -- all catching the light with a differing effect of brilliancy.

    The Frontiersmen

  • In the midst of the confusion, the wild cries, the swift running figures, the surging of the crowds into the chungke-yard that obliterated the wide glare of the sun on the white sand, he made good his escape.

    The Frontiersmen

  • Several other young braves had come into the yard, and were idly tossing the lance at the great chungke-pole -- as a billiardist of the civilized life of that day might pocket the balls with a purposeless cue after a match.

    The Frontiersmen

  • The heavy discoidal quartz stone skimmed through the air above the stretch of sand, and striking with its beveled edge the kneeling figure on the temple, the future of the victor at chungke became in one moment the past.

    The Frontiersmen

  • As there are moot points concerning the stones themselves and the conduct of the sport, so the chungke spears differ in the accounts of the early adventurers in this region.

    The Frontiersmen

  • He would not witness the game of chungke, expressly played in honor of his visit.

    The Frontiersmen

  • The chungke stone is often confounded with the Indian quoit, likewise circular and fashioned of smoothly wrought stone, but with an orifice in the centre, rendering it in effect a ring to be flung over a stake at a distance, or to be caught on the point of a lance.

    The Frontiersmen

  • The exquisite finish of the chungke stone was compassed without the aid of a single tool, merely by the attrition of one stone upon another,

    The Frontiersmen

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