Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Something sacred or secret, applied both to an object and to the quality possessed by it.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative form of tjurunga.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dr. Munro next reproduces two _wooden_ churinga (_churinga irula_), as being very unlike the Clydesdale objects _in stone_ {84a} (figures 5, 6).

    The Clyde Mystery a Study in Forgeries and Folklore

  • They carried with them sacred stones called churinga, i.e. soul or spirit-life.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • {80a} I have no concern with an object, never seen by Dr. Munro, or by me, to my knowledge, but described as a "churinga"; in _Journal of

    The Clyde Mystery a Study in Forgeries and Folklore

  • They believed that conception was occasioned by the woman passing near a churinga -- a peculiarly shaped piece of wood or stone, in which a spirit-child was concealed, which entered into her.

    Bygone Beliefs

  • Further, their most important function is to take charge of the sacred storehouse, usually a cleft in the rocks or a hole in the ground, where are kept the holy stones and sticks (churinga) with which the souls of all the people, both living and dead, are apparently supposed to be in a manner bound up.

    Chapter 6. Magicians as Kings

  • The rites of initiation in this tribe, as in the other Central tribes, comprise the operations of circumcision and subincision; and as soon as the second of these has been performed on him, the young man receives from his father a sacred stick (churinga), with which, he is told, his spirit was associated in the remotest past.

    Chapter 67. The External Soul in Folk-Custom. § 4. The Ritual of Death and Resurrection

  • Further, their most important function is to take charge of the sacred storehouse, usually a cleft in the rocks or a hole in the ground, where are kept the holy stones and sticks (churinga) with which the souls of all the people, both living and dead, are apparently supposed to be in a manner bound up.

    The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion

  • The rites of initiation in this tribe, as in the other Central tribes, comprise the operations of circumcision and subincision; and as soon as the second of these has been performed on him, the young man receives from his father a sacred stick (churinga), with which, he is told, his spirit was associated in the remotest past.

    The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion

  • Thus the totem of the child will be the totem of the spot whence the churinga was taken.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • The object, e.g. stone, piece of wood, etc., that met her eye at that moment is carefully taken as the churinga of the child and placed in the secret storehouse of the tribe kept for that purpose.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

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