Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of chuse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He questioned the provision that said the number of representatives “shall not exceed one for every 30,000” unlike later writers, however, he objected because he thought that ratio would make the House too large and unwieldy in the future, and he disagreed with giving Congress the right to make or alter state provisions on the times, places, and manner of electing representatives and senators, “except as to the places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

  • One of its new powers was tucked away in Article I, Section 4: “The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives” would be set by the various state legislatures, “but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

  • The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.

    Ratification

  • The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.

    Ratification

  • Meanwhile, Gilbert Dench of Hopkinton western Middlesex County, who had strong reservations on the Constitution, was eager to jump ahead and discuss Article I, Section 4, which gave Congress the right to make or alter the times, places, and manner set by state legislatures for electing senators and representatives “except as to the Places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

  • He questioned the provision that said the number of representatives “shall not exceed one for every 30,000” unlike later writers, however, he objected because he thought that ratio would make the House too large and unwieldy in the future, and he disagreed with giving Congress the right to make or alter state provisions on the times, places, and manner of electing representatives and senators, “except as to the places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

  • But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice.

    Ratification

  • The committee of the whole skipped the rest of Article I, Section 3, on the composition of the Senate, and turned to Section 4, which gave Congress the right to “make or alter” state regulations of the “Times, Places, and Manner” of electing senators and representatives “except as to the Places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

  • The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

    Ratification

  • One of its new powers was tucked away in Article I, Section 4: “The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives” would be set by the various state legislatures, “but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.”

    Ratification

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