Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cill.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It acknowledged the window frames were "decaying", there were "visible gaps" in the ageing timber cills, and that the seals were "failing".

    Archive 2006-07-01

  • It acknowledged the window frames were "decaying", there were "visible gaps" in the ageing timber cills, and that the seals were "failing".

    Four year wait for replacement windows?

  • I feel really bad about not saying anything before. but seeing cills photo the other day makes me realize she could never have looked after herself.

    Disordered Minds

  • Ive found louise and she's living with another abuser plus there's stuff going on here that's doing my head in. lou looks like cill trevelyan and she was married to one of cills rapists for a while. she says there's things mum kept to herself to save the family embarrassment and I want to know what they are.

    Disordered Minds

  • The stone-cutters turned out the mouldings, mullions, capitals, cills, steps, and all that was essential in our building operations.

    Prisoners Their Own Warders A Record of the Convict Prison at Singapore in the Straits Settlements Established 1825

  • The starboard guns were also run in amidships and secured by tackles, the moving over of this great weight of metal bringing the larboard lower-deck port-cills just level with the water.

    The Loss of the Royal George

  • The roof coping, the window cills and heads are all made of brick and set flush.

    Dezeen

  • The roof coping, the window cills and heads are all made of brick and set flush.

    Dezeen

  • Minor works to façade of 65 Fitzwilliam Square North (cleaning of stonework plinth and cills to the front and rear façades and minor repairs to the slate roofs).

    An Irish Town Planner's Blog

  • The foreman came off from the dock-yard, and stated that it was necessary that the ship should be careened over to port sufficiently to raise the mouth of the pipe -- which went through the ship's timbers below -- clean out of the water, that they might work at it; so, between seven and eight o'clock on that morning, the whole of the larboard guns were run out as far as they could be, and of course the larboard lower deck ports were open; the starboard guns were also run in amidships, and secured by the tackles; the shifting over of this great weight of metal brought the larboard lower deck port-cills just level with the water; the men were then able to get at the mouth of the pipe to the water-cock on the starboard side, as it was clean out of water, and for about an hour they were working away hard at it.

    Poor Jack

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