Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of cinquain.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Mukhammas, cinquains or pentastichs (Night cmlxiv.), represents a stanza of two distichs and a hemistich in monorhyme, the fifth line being the “bob” or burden: each succeeding stanza affects a new rhyme, except in the fifth line, e.g., aaaab + ccccb + ddddb and so forth.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Right now I'm assigning a poem or two a week they've done the "uncorrupted" poem I described earlier, sonnets, haikus, cinquains, and acrostics.

    Fun With Iambs

  • NEW THIS MONTH: I would like to ask for a theme for all entries and this month's theme is short poetry -- limericks, haiku, tanka, renku, cinquains, you name it -- anything is welcome as long as it is 6 lines or less. posted by Brandon | 7:41 AM

    Archive 2005-10-01

  • NEW THIS MONTH: I would like to ask for a theme for all entries and this month's theme is short poetry -- limericks, haiku, tanka, renku, cinquains, you name it -- anything is welcome as long as it is 6 lines or less. posted by Brandon | 7:41 AM

    Notables

  • She impresses her uncommon qualities upon you, in the cinquains of hers, with genuinely incisive force.

    Adventures in the Arts Informal Chapters on Painters, Vaudeville, and Poets

  • Brevities that whirl through the mind as you read those cinquains of Adelaide Crapsey, like white birds through the dark woodlands of the night.

    Adventures in the Arts Informal Chapters on Painters, Vaudeville, and Poets

  • Then he sat down by a stream and washed his hands and feet and face and rested awhile: and recalling his late easy and pleasant life of union with his beloved and contrasting it with his present plight of trouble and weariness and hunger and strangerhood and severance, the tears streamed from his eyes and he repeated the following cinquains:

    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Volume III

  • Sherkan's boon-companions, weeping till his eyes resembled rivers, and recalled the dead man's noble qualities, reciting the following cinquains:

    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Volume II

  • [FN#310] The stanza is called Al-Mukhammas = cinquains; the quatrains and the "bob," or "burden" always preserve the same consonance.

    Arabian nights. English

  • The Mukhammas, cinquains or pentastichs (Night cmlxiv.), represents a stanza of two distichs and a hemistich in monorhyme, the fifth line being the "bob" or burden: each succeeding stanza affects a new rhyme, except in the fifth line, e.g., aaaab + ccccb + ddddb and so forth.

    Arabian nights. English

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