Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The name by which a clan is known.
  • noun One of a set of names belonging to a clan by which the bearer of the name is recognized as a member of the clan.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In 542 B.C. a concubine of one of the Lu rulers is spoken of by her clan-name and her posthumous name.

    Ancient China Simplified

  • The new Emperor enfeoffed fifteen "brother" states, and forty more having the same clan-name as himself: these fifty-five were presumably all new states, enjoying mesne-lord or semi-suzerain privileges over the host of insignificant principalities; and it might as well be mentioned here that this imperial clan name of

    Ancient China Simplified

  • Thus, as both Ts'in and Chao bore the same original clan-name of Ying, granted to the Ts'in family as possessions of the Ts'in fief (Eastern Kan Suh province) by the early Chou emperors in 870 B.C.,

    Ancient China Simplified

  • Probably it was only the fact of the Tsin ruling family bearing the same clan-name as the Emperor that had decided Tsin throughout to be orthodox Chinese instead of Tartar.

    Ancient China Simplified

  • As her clan-name must, according to rule, be mentioned at her burial, she was not formally buried at all, but the whole affair was hushed up, and she was called by the fancy name of Mêng-tsz (exactly the same characters as "Mencius"),

    Ancient China Simplified

  • Curiously enough, it fell to the lot of the son and successor of the Emperor Muh to have to punish and destroy a petty vassal state whose ruler had committed the incestuous act of marrying three sisters of his own clan-name.

    Ancient China Simplified

  • Of the three, Tsin alone bore the imperial Chou clan-name of

    Ancient China Simplified

  • This gave the Kings of Wu, though barbarian, a pretext for claiming equality with, and even seniority over Tsin, the first Chou-born prince of which was junior in descent to most of the other enfeoffed vassals of the imperial clan-name.

    Ancient China Simplified

  • Persons of the same clan-name could not properly intermarry.

    Ancient China Simplified

  • At a Lu funeral in 626 B.C. the Emperor's representative to the vassal state is spoken of complimentarily by his social appellation in view of his possessing first-class ministerial rank: he cannot be spoken of by his detached clan-name, or family name, "because he has not yet received a town in fee."

    Ancient China Simplified

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