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Examples

  • "I hold that clann-Morna were attacked first, and that they are to be free from payment of damages."

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • But Fionn affirmed that he would make no peace with clann-Morna until the matter had been judged by the king, Cormac mac Art, and by his daughter Ailve, and by his son Cairbre of Ana Life 'and by Fintan the chief poet.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • Oisi'n and Oscar and mac Lugac came, with the nobles of clann-Baiscne, and with those of clann-Corcoran and clann-Smo'l; they all came, and they were all bound.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • But for dread of the clann-Morna he did not go as Fionn.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • He had taken to the wilds when clann-Baiscne was broken, and he was at war with a world that had dared to kill his Chief.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • "I marvel," said the king in a discontented voice, "that, considering the numbers against them, the losses of clann-Morna should be so small."

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • Fionn's people and the clann-Morna rose at each other, and what had started as a brawl ended as a battle with eleven hundred of Fionn's people and sixty-one of Goll's people dead.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • She could not keep him with her for dread of the clann-Morna.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • a member of Fionn's family (there was deadly feud between clann-Baiscne and clann-Morna), yet a call from Fionn brought Goll raging to his assistance like a lion that rages tenderly by his mate.

    Irish Fairy Tales

  • a blood-tie could have bound them to the clann-Baiscne, for it is not easy, having moved in the world of court and camp, to go hide with a baby in a wood; and to live, as they must have lived, in terror.

    Irish Fairy Tales

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