Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of clarion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Ever since the fall of Edessa Christendom had been uneasy in its hopes and fears for Jerusalem, and popes and abbots were stirring in their sleep to consider their beleaguered capital, and raise their voices like clarions calling to the defence of the Church.

    A River So Long

  • It is instructive that the overly vocal right wing Conservatives on the one hand, usually the clarions of personal rights, would tell those less advantaged what rights they do not have.

    Matthew Anderson: The Anatomy of a Foreclosure

  • “Turn to me, turn to me,” leaning into love despite the clarions blasting “Danger, danger, stay away!”

    In Praise of Improvisation

  • A squadron of magnificent body-guards, with their clarions at their head, were descending the Avenue de Neuilly; the white flag, showing faintly rosy in the setting sun, floated over the dome of the Tuileries.

    Les Miserables

  • If we are the clarions of freedom, and if we're willing to put the bodies of our young men and women on the line, then certainly the president of the United States should do his very least, which is to put his mouth on the line, because we are paying the price.

    CNN Transcript Sep 8, 2007

  • If we are the clarions of freedom, and if we're willing to put the bodies of our young men and women on the line, then certainly the president of the United States should do his very least, which is to put his mouth on the line, because we are paying the price.

    CNN Transcript Sep 9, 2007

  • When the silver clarions had blown, and under a clear chorus of white-robed children chanting round the organ, the noble procession passed into the chapel, and was hidden from our sight for a while, there was silence, or from the inner chapel ever so faint a hum.

    Roundabout Papers

  • At half-past ten, after coffee, the brilliant warriors of the cavalry were ready; their clarions rung to horse, their banners were given to the wind, their shirt-collars were exquisitely starched, and the whole air was scented with the odors of their pomatums and pocket-handkerchiefs.

    Burlesques

  • Yes! one sees them: the poet sees them still in the far-off Cloudland, and hears the ring of their clarions as they hasten to battle or tourney — and the dim echoes of their lutes chanting of love and fair ladies!

    Burlesques

  • At half-past ten, after coffee, the brilliant warriors of the cavalry were ready; their clarions rung to horse, their banners were given to the wind, their shirt-collars were exquisitely starched, and the whole air was scented with the odors of their pomatums and pocket-handkerchiefs.

    The History of the Next French Revolution

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