Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of clepsydra.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They merely give an ingenious demonstration that air is something — by straining wine-skins and showing the resistance of the air, and by cutting it off in clepsydras.

    Physics

  • Typical among them are marked, or calibrated, candles, sun dials, sand glasses, clepsydras and oil clocks.

    Magicians of Gor

  • Typical among them are marked, or calibrated, candles, sun dials, sand glasses, clepsydras and oil clocks.

    Magicians of Gor

  • The Arabian astronomers also devoted themselves to the construction and perfection of astronomical instruments, to the measurement of time by clocks of various kinds, by clepsydras and sun-dials.

    History of the Conflict between Religion and Science

  • The flight of time in New England houses was marked without doors by sun-dials; within, by noon-marks, hour-glasses, and rarely by clepsydras, or water-clocks.

    Customs and Fashions in Old New England

  • Of all clocks, clepsydras, Geneva-watches, hour-glasses, sun-dials and Linnæan flower-clocks, commend me "would say John Cranston" to thy clock, O Festus, which was a heart and measured time by throbs.

    Tiger-Lilies. A Novel.

  • Toledo he constructed two clepsydras, the waters of which decreased and increased according to the waning and growing of the moon, and these two basins were destroyed only in A.D. 1133 by Alphonse VI., when he took Toledo.

    Arabic Authors A Manual of Arabian History and Literature

  • Before there were hour-glasses and clepsydras, most phenomena could be estimated as to their durations and intervals, with no greater precision than degrees of hardness can be estimated by the fingers.

    Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects Everyman's Library

  • The Arabian astronomers also devoted themselves to the construction and perfection of astronomical instruments, to the measurement of time by clocks of various kinds, by clepsydras and sun-dials.

    History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science

  • (heathendom had been cleaner, but we must not repine); for the suffering, too, and for pilgrims, exceptional food was provided -- young pigeons, delicate fish, fruit, honey; a new kind of lamp was invented, to burn for long hours without attention; dials and clepsydras marked the progress of day and night.

    By the Ionian Sea

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