Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as clipper, 1.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These were not the brisk, devilish, able-bodied men who manned the ships of the old clipper-ship days; who fought their officers, who had the points of their sheath-knives broken off, who killed and were killed, but who did their work as men.

    CHAPTER VI

  • The clipper-ship era is probably the most celebrated period of marine history — the inspiration for the paintings and prints that seem to hang everywhere, from stodgy clubs to fast-food restaurants.

    The Seafarer

  • At Credit Suisse Group, the legacy of First Boston remains only in a logo that evokes that investment bank's famous clipper-ship brand, while you can see Donaldson Lufkin & Jenrette only in the name of Credit Suisse's private-equity arm, DLJ Merchant Banking.

    Rising Tide

  • They sailed by the clipper-ship ATRATA and travelled in style, accompanied by a maid to attend to Mary and both nurses. —

    The Way Home

  • And so the very last kisses and handclasps exchanged, the travellers climbed down into a boat already deep in the water with other cuddy-passengers and their luggage, and were rowed out to where lay that good clipper-ship, the RED JACKET.

    Australia Felix

  • What if the Panama Canal were to be closed, requiring shipping to go “around the Horn,” as in clipper-ship days?

    Turmoil and Triumph

  • What if the Panama Canal were to be closed, requiring shipping to go “around the Horn,” as in clipper-ship days?

    Turmoil and Triumph

  • New York, had been at the head of fast clipper-ship lines -- the New

    Manual of Ship Subsidies

  • If every man is willing to give up his morning paper, wear a linen shirt, cross the ocean in a clipper-ship, and burn wood in an open fire-place, something might be done.

    Acadia or, A Month with the Blue Noses

  • The Yankee whittling a shingle with his jack-knife is commonly accepted as a caricature, but it is an unconscious symbolization of the plastic instinct which rises step by step to the clothes-pin, the apple-parer, the mowing-machine, the wooden truss-bridge, the clipper-ship, the carved figure-head, the Cleopatra of the World's Exhibition.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 78, April, 1864

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