Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of colourman.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A vender of paints, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. pl. colormen, colourmen (-men). One who prepares and sells colors.
  • n. In leather manuf., the man who mixes the dyes. Most factories have a special workman who attends to this.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • My colorman, Bill Raftery, motioned with his hand at Mullin.

    Len Berman: Top 5 Sports Stories

  • Because it is one of a few publications that can be connected to an eighteenth-century colorman and the only one that offers to bring French technique to a London clientele, we need to consider seriously its claims and its contents.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Diligent use of publications could substitute for training at the academies, famously exclusive institutions. reference de Massoul also provides a list of supplies to present to the colorman, should the reader decided to teach her or himself.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Constant de Massoul was an artist's colorman who operated a shop on Bond Street in London at the end of the eighteenth century.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • This strategy parallels our understanding of the production of colors in the workshop, where access to materials and skills lead to results with specific qualities — cudbear, for example, or Viquesnel's carmine, or the Spanish yellow the London colormaking firm Louis Berger made exclusively for the London-based artist's colorman James Newman. 9 This strategy recognizes the skill of the artisan as well.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Perhaps the Florentinerlack supplied by Schäffer's colorman did not look the same as the carmine he sold; but perhaps for another different colorman Florentinerlack and carmine were more similar.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • In 1801, William Dyer, a drysalter, colorman, and correspondent of Joseph Priestley and other scientists in Britain, reduced fifty years of diary-keeping to two volumes of tantalizing abstracts about his work and interests. 11 As a result, we have only hints about his venture to produce and sell the pigment known as Spanish brown.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • August-Ludewig Pfannenschmid was a colorman who worked in or near Hanover in the later eighteenth century.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • If Hoofnail was an artisan, perhaps a colorman, New Practical Improvements may have served to supplement public or private lessons as books by Peter Shaw, Constant de Massoul reference, Louis-August Pfannenschmid reference did.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • This layer modified the ground color, making it a more appropriate undercolor for Hayman's painting technique. 3 It is probable that the canvas was prepared by a colorman or other supplier, as the Foundling Museum collection has another painting, from the same period but by another artist, with identical ground and toning layers.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

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