Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The common name for the flying-lemur, Galeopithecus volans. Called also kaguan and kubong.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A peculiar East Indian mammal (Galleopithecus volans), having along the sides, connecting the fore and hind limbs, a parachutelike membrane, by means of which it is able to make long leaps, like the flying squirrel; -- called also flying lemur.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An arboreal gliding mammal, of order Dermoptera, native to South-east Asia.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun arboreal nocturnal mammal of southeast Asia and the Philippines resembling a lemur and having a fold of skin on each side from neck to tail that is used for long gliding leaps

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Of Malayan origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From a Malayo-Polynesian language.

Examples

  • (Eurekalert.) Scientists had recognized just two species of these enigmatic mammals, the Sunda colugo and the Philippine colugo.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • However, the new findings show that the Sunda colugo, found only in Indochina and Sundaland, including the large islands of Borneo, Sumatra, and Java, actually represents at least three separate species.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • The colugo, or so-called ‘flying lemur’, of the south-east Asian forests resembles the flying squirrels and flying phalangers, except that the tail, as well as the arms and legs, is included in the support structure of the flight membrane.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • The colugo, or so-called ‘flying lemur’, of the south-east Asian forests resembles the flying squirrels and flying phalangers, except that the tail, as well as the arms and legs, is included in the support structure of the flight membrane.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • As sea levels, forest communities, and river systems fluctuated in Sundaland over the last 10 million years, Janecka speculates that isolated colugo populations would have undergone greater diversification from one another than other, more mobile mammals.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • A Malayan colugo glides between trees with a baby hanging on.

    Original Signal - Transmitting Buzz

  • Scientists had recognized just two species of these enigmatic mammals, the Sunda colugo and the Philippine colugo.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • "It appears that within smaller geographic areas, for example Java, there are divergent colugo lineages that could prove to be separate species," said Janecka.

    dailyindia.com News Feed

  • "It appears that within smaller geographic areas, for example Java, there are divergent colugo lineages that could prove to be separate species," he added.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • However, the new findings show that the Sunda colugo, found only in Indochina and Sundaland, including the large islands of Borneo, Sumatra, and Java, actually represents at least three separate species.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

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