commodiousness love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state or quality of being commodious; suitableness for its purpose; convenience; fitness: as, the commodiousness of a house.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun State of being commodious; suitableness for its purpose; convenience; roominess.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or quality of being commodious.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun spatial largeness and extensiveness (especially inside a building)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Part of the "commodiousness" of a building should be how it serves people who may never enter it.

    Frank Gruber: Urban Design, the Book: Part Two of a Review

  • We had a pleasing conviction of the commodiousness of civilization, and heartily laughed at the ravings of those absurd visionaries who have attempted to persuade us of the superior advantages of a state of nature.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • The chief hotel at Sherton – Abbas was an old stone-fronted inn with a yawning arch, under which vehicles were driven by stooping coachmen to back premises of wonderful commodiousness.

    The Woodlanders

  • Having said this in his First Book of Good Deeds, he says again, that both commodiousness and grace pertain to mean or indifferent things, none of which according to them, is profitable.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • So in the wood and the hollows he hid a number of archers and spearmen, confident that the commodiousness of the place would allure the Romans.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • The commodiousness of money is indeed great; but there are some advantages which money cannot buy, and which therefore no wise man will by the love of money be tempted to forego.

    A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland

  • “The boundless extent of territory we possess, the wholesome temperament of our climate, the luxuriance and fertility of our soil, the variety of our products, the rapidity of the growth of our population, the industry of our countrymen, and the commodiousness of our ports” had caused “a jealousy of our dawning splendor.”

    Alexander Hamilton, American

  • “The boundless extent of territory we possess, the wholesome temperament of our climate, the luxuriance and fertility of our soil, the variety of our products, the rapidity of the growth of our population, the industry of our countrymen, and the commodiousness of our ports” had caused “a jealousy of our dawning splendor.”

    Alexander Hamilton, American

  • The harbors are very marvels of commodiousness, that of Port Jackson, the entrance to Sydney, being fifteen miles long.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 15, No. 87, March, 1875

  • Agricola by men of experience, that never had any captain more sagely chosen his stations for commodiousness and situation; for that no place of strength founded by him, was ever taken by violence, or abandoned upon articles or despair.

    The Reign of Tiberius, Out of the First Six Annals of Tacitus; With His Account of Germany, and Life of Agricola

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