Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb archaic Third-person singular present simple form of complain

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

complain +‎ -eth

Examples

  • Replied Obayd, No! But whenever I have by me a guest like thee, he complaineth in the morning of the mosquito bites, and this happeneth only when he is like thee beardless.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Presently, one of her maids brought her a silken bag, which she opened and taking thereout a lute, laid it in her lap and smote its strings, whereat it complained as child complaineth to mother, and she sang these two couplets,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then she strained the lute to her bosom, bending over it as mother bendeth over babe, and swept the strings which complained as child to mother complaineth; after which she played upon it and began improvisng these couplets,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Clitophon, in the first book of Achilles, Tatius, complaineth how that his mistress Leucippe tormented him much more in the night than in the day.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Amphelinam depereunt, &c. They neigh after other men's wives (as Jeremia, cap.v. 8. complaineth) like fed horses, or range like town bulls, raptores virginum et viduarum, as many of our great ones do.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Lookes a-squint on his discourse, and smiles, when hee complaineth.

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • Lookes a-squint on his discourse, and smiles, when hee complaineth.

    Friday Poetry Blogging: Thomas Campion

  • These are the things which David so often and so bitterly complaineth of, and which with so much earnestness he contendeth and wrestleth with God to be delivered from.

    Pneumatologia

  • And we are sure that as God complaineth that his sanctuary is polluted, when there are brought into it

    A Discourse concerning Evangelical Love, Church Peace, and Unity

  • The truth is, that our friend had been reading among the essays of a contemporary, who has perversely been confounded with him, a paper in which Edax (or the Great Eater) humorously complaineth of an inordinate appetite; and it struck him that a better paper -- of deeper interest, and wider usefulness -- might be made out of the imagined experiences of a

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 11, No. 67, May, 1863

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