Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality of being conducive or tending to advance or promote.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The quality of conducing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state, quality, or condition of being conducive.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Talk of the conduciveness of Lebanon's presidency of the Security Council to the Palestinian issue fall but under exaggeration, sycophancy, and political grandstanding.

    Raghida Dergham: Palestine at the United Nations: The Long Path of Wisdom

  • Talk of the conduciveness of Lebanon's presidency of the Security Council to the Palestinian issue fall but under exaggeration, sycophancy, and political grandstanding.

    Raghida Dergham: Palestine at the United Nations: The Long Path of Wisdom

  • These norms are grounded in considerations of reliability or truth-conduciveness.

    Reliabilism

  • Robust reliability is truth-conduciveness in a very wide set of epistemically relevant possible worlds, worlds that are experientially very much like the actual world but in other respects possibly quite different from this one.

    Reliabilism

  • A good track record in one sphere is not in itself evidence for truth-conduciveness in another.

    Naturalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics

  • Of course, the historical character of process reliabilism gives the theory an externalist character (which it has in any case by virtue of its use of truth-conduciveness).

    Reliabilism

  • They must be capable of fulfilling the conditions of action, and the conditions of self-restraint, which are necessary either for keeping the established polity in existence, or for enabling it to achieve the ends, its conduciveness to which forms its recommendation.

    Representative Government

  • Hume and Adam Smith, rendering explicit what had been emerging over the century, fixed on the notion of utility: though men did not calculate utility in making their moral judgments, the underlying principle was the general conduciveness to happiness of the action sympathized with or approved.

    HAPPINESS AND PLEASURE

  • He must prove: (1) That pleasure is the only thing ultimately desirable; (2) that each is under obligation to promote the pleasure of all; (3) that its mere conduciveness to the production of a preponderance of pleasure makes an action right, even though the pleasure be a malicious one, as in the illustration above given.

    A Handbook of Ethical Theory

  • "Every work, both of nature and art, is a system; and as every particular thing both natural and artificial is for some use or purpose out of or beyond itself, one may add to what has been already brought into the idea of a system its conduciveness to this one or more ends."

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

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