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Examples

  • Tout Le monde connoit les liaisons de ce pays cy avec L'Angleterre.

    John Adams diary 34, 5 -- 26 October 1782

  • "Editions Stéphaniennes dont on connoit un on plusieurs exemplaires imprimés sur vélin."

    Catalogue of the William Loring Andrews Collection of Early Books in the Library of Yale University

  • Toutes les femmes y étoient tenues par les diables par lors il y avoit de la lumière une chandelle tenue au millieu par une femme que ne connoit ....

    The Witch-cult in Western Europe A Study in Anthropology

  • In fact, Fergus Mac-Ivor, of whom a Frenchman might have said, as truly as of any man in the Highlands, ` ` _Qu'il connoit bien ses gens, _ '' had no idea of raising himself in the eyes of an

    The Waverley

  • Il faut toujours estre content de l'ordre du passé, parce qu'il est conforme à la volonté de Dieu absolue, qu'on connoit par l'évènement.

    A Lecture on the Study of History

  • #94 Ceux qui ne sont pas contens de l'ordere des choses ne scauroient se vanter d'aimer Dieu comme il faut -- Il faut toujours estre content de l'ordre du passe, parce qu'il est conforme a la volonte de Dieu absolue, qu'on connoit par l'evenement.

    Lectures on Modern history

  • In fact, Fergus Mac-Ivor, of whom a Frenchman might have said as truly as of any man in the Highlands, 'Qu'il connoit bien ses gens' had no idea of raising himself in the eyes of an English young man of fortune by appearing with a retinue of idle

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • In fact, Fergus Mac-Ivor, of whom a Frenchman might have said as truly as of any man in the Highlands, 'Qu'il connoit bien ses gens' had no idea of raising himself in the eyes of an English young man of fortune by appearing with a retinue of idle Highlanders disproportioned to the occasion.

    Waverley

  • In fact, Fergus Mac-Ivor, of whom a Frenchman might have said as truly as of any man in the Highlands, 'Qu'il connoit bien ses gens' had no idea of raising himself in the eyes of an English young man of fortune by appearing with a retinue of idle

    Waverley — Complete

  • And in a few lines after, he foists in an extract from a Scotchman, one _Barclay_, who, in his _Examen of Nations_, says, _Jenenc connoit point de plus aimable creature, qui un François chez qui l'enjoument est tempore par le judgment, & par discretion_; to all which I subscribe: but such men are seldom to be met with in any kingdom.

    A Year's Journey through France and Part of Spain, Volume II (of 2)

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