Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Having the power of implying or suggesting something in addition to what is explicit. Contrasted with denotative.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to connotation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective of or relating to a connotation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This is not to say that an overblown articulation lacks some denotational insight, I stress, but to say it lacks connotational impact.

    Archive 2010-03-01

  • This is not to say that an overblown articulation lacks some denotational insight, I stress, but to say it lacks connotational impact.

    On the Sublime

  • I think I am gender neutral on that one - but I do realize that it is hard for other people to navigate the personal minefield that is my connotational experience.

    When We ASS-U-ME

  • I wonder if there is an official term for what I mean by connotational experience.

    When We ASS-U-ME

  • “You made your connotational bed, now lie in it.”

    Can we find a better term for “Marginalized” People?

  • There are specific connotational disincentives to “liberal,” too.

    Can we find a better term for “Marginalized” People?

  • On a different tack, he chooses winter and spring, words that have gigantic semantic fields, with several denotational and connotational meanings, and countless metaphorical extensions.

    The Right Word in the Right Place at the Right Time

  • On a different tack, he chooses winter and spring, words that have gigantic semantic fields, with several denotational and connotational meanings, and countless metaphorical extensions.

    The Right Word in the Right Place at the Right Time

  • The results suggested that this affective, connotational or semantic component could play an extremely important role in cognitive processing generally.

    Roger W. Sperry - Nobel Lecture

  • A major thrust in our current work is aimed at determining more precisely what shades of emotional, connotational or semantic content are able to cross through the brainstem and how they affect cognitive processing on the other side.

    Roger W. Sperry - Nobel Lecture

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